Contact PMSDirections to PMSSite Map

pmslibrary@piedmont.k12.ca.us Subscribe to my updates

Posts Tagged «refugees»

Nowhere Boy

Wednesday, September 4th, 2019

by Katherine Marsh, 362 pages, Grades 6-8.

Max has just moved from the U.S. to Belgium with his family. The family is renting a home in Brussels and Max will be attending the local middle school where the language is FRENCH! He doesn’t yet speak French which seems like a big problem to Max – it’s hard enough to understand a school’s culture and make friends in a new school when you DO speak the language, but Max’s parents are unsympathetic. 

Ahmed has just arrived in Brussels as well, but he is a refugee from Syria. He would give anything to attend school, even if it was in another language, but the more urgent problems for him are finding a place to sleep and food to eat. It is especially tough for anyone who looks Muslim in Brussels because of the recent terror attack, so Ahmed thinks it is best to hide out an lay low for a while. The safe place he finds to hide is a basement room full of boxes… boxes being stored because the home is being rented out to a family from the U.S.

If you are interested in reading more stories about refugees and immigrants you might also enjoy: Refugee, by Alan Gratz, Salt to the Sea, Ruta Sepetys, or In The Sea There Are Crocodiles, by Fabio Geda.

Refugee

Monday, November 27th, 2017

51pelgst+7L._SX334_BO1,204,203,200_by Alan Gratz, 338 pages, Grades 6-8

Three stories, three different times, all refugees escaping a beloved home where it has become too dangerous to continue to live. Josef’s family is escaping Nazi Germany in 1939, Isabel and her family are braving an escape from communist Cuba in 1994, and in 2015 Mahmoud and his family are desperately running from the violent war in Syria that continues today. Each family encounters a series of unbelievable challenges and dangers that threaten their lives, their sanity and their faith in humanity itself. Josef and his mother board the crowded ship, the St. Louis, with his father who is suffering delusions and severe anxiety after spending some time in a concentration camp. Isabel’s sea journey is in a makeshift boat built by a neighbor; her pregnant mother courageously comes along despite the fact that she is almost due to give birth. Mahmoud’s family endures abuse, and even imprisonment and beating as they try to make their way north to Germany. Each story alternates, but you can choose to read each story chronologically following the narrator if you prefer.

If you enjoy harrowing stories of historical fiction you might also enjoy: A Night Divided, by Jennifer Nielsen, Salt to the Sea, by Ruta Sepetys, Chains, by Laurie Halse Anderson, or Echo, by Pam Munoz Ryan.