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Posts Tagged «predjudices»

Here to Stay

Wednesday, September 4th, 2019

by Sara Farizan, 265 pages, Grades 8 and up.

Bijan loves playing basketball; mostly he just wants to have a normal high school experience. He is an amazing basketball player and all was going well until someone photoshopped his face into a photo of someone else to make him look like a terrorist and shared it with the whole school! Bijan just wants to forget it and hope everyone else will ignore it. It’s not that he is ashamed of his middle eastern heritage, he just doesn’t want to be the token Muslim American; he doesn’t want to stand out for any reason, especially his race. Unfortunately he can’t control everyone around him and it does become a big deal for his friends, family, the school administration, and there are also people at school and in the community who are now voicing their predjudice. What can Bijan do to get back to normal, and who can he trust to help him?

If you like books with sports that are really about more that the sport itself, you might also enjoy: 

Under the Blood Red Sun, by Graham Sallisbury, Heat, by Mike Lupica, or The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie.

The Entertainer and the Dybbuk

Sunday, September 20th, 2009

enterainerby Sid Fleischman, p. 180  Grades 6-9

The Great Freddie is a washed-up ventriloquist (he can’t speak without moving his lips) living in Europe following WWII until one night in Vienna, Austria he opens the closet in his hotel room and finds a dybbuk or Jewish spirit of a boy (Avrom Amos Poliakov) killed by Nazi soldiers during the war.To repay a debt he owes the boy for an incident that happened during the war, Freddie allows Avrom to possess his body and speak through him for the purpose of tracking down the boy’s killer and becoming a bar mitzvah.In the process, Avrom turns The Great Freddie’s ventriloquism act into a smash success and finds a platform for speaking out about the atrocities against Jews by the Nazis during the war, but Freddie finds himself in some awkward situations with his girlfriend.

Connections:  Some other great fiction titles that illustrate the treatment of Jews during World War II try reading Number the Stars by Lois Lowry, The Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen, or Hitler’s Canary by Sandy Toksvig.  Check out this video interview with the author.