Contact PMSDirections to PMSSite Map

pmslibrary@piedmont.k12.ca.us Subscribe to my updates

Posts Tagged «Native Americans»

Killer of Enemies

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

by Joseph Bruchac, 361 pages. Grades 8 and up

17946249In the not too distant future people had relied on technology for everything. Anyone with money and power has so much faith in tech that they use it to enhance not only their homes and their world but also augment themselves physically. Those with the most power were called the “Ones.” But then the cloud came and all tech ceased to function. Some of the Ones survived and became leaders of walled communities where all people had to live to stay alive; Lozen lives in a walled city called Haven and she is the Killer of Enemies. People in pre-cloud times had also done a lot of genetic splicing and engineering to create incredible zoos, and personal collections of invented creatures. Now that the tech no longer keeps their cages locked and now that their owners have hidden themselves in walled cities and no longer feed their pets, giant alligator-sharks, sabertooth-lion-apes and other giant, hungry creatures roam the earth looking for food. Lozen’s job is to clear an area of these beasts for the Ones that control Haven. It is not only dangerous outside the walls; people die every day inside Haven. The Ones are harsh rulers and they are using the safety of her family to coerce her into working for them. She is just hoping she can stay alive long enough to get her family out of Haven.

If you enjoy science fiction adventure you might also like: Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card, or Shipbreaker, by Paolo Bacigalupi. If you enjoy science fiction with strong female characters you might also like: Cinder, by Marissa Meyer, or Illuminae, by Jay Kristoff.

Crows & Cards

Friday, February 26th, 2010

crows and cardsby Joseph Helgerson   p. 279   Grades:  6-8

Twelve-year-old Zebulon Crabtree is angry with his father for shipping  him off on a Mississippi riverboat to St. Louis to become a tanner’s apprentice.  He quickly decides to disobey his dad when  Chilly Larpenteur, a cardshark and con man, tricks him out of his money and convinces Zeb to join his racket.   Zeb pretty much becomes Chilly’s prisoner, being locked in the cupboard of the gambling house each evening and forced to work the wire that signals Chilly about his opponent’s cards, so he can cheat.   Zeb’s only hope is to escape, and with the help and friendship of a slave and a Hidasta Indian chief and his daughter, he may succeed.  This is a humorous, rollicking adventure reminiscent of Mark Twain’s novels.

Connections:  The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventues of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain and The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by W. R. Philbrick.

Blood on the River: James Town 1607

Monday, January 25th, 2010

bloodontheriverby Elisa Carbone    p. 224   Grades 5-8

Barely escaping the gallows in London, orphan Sam Collier finds himself the page to Captain John Smith and on his way to the New World to help settle the Jamestown colony.  Smith believes the survival skills Sam has honed on the streets of London and even his violent temper will make him a successful settler in this challenging new frontier.  Captain Smith faces challenges of his own.  Although he has a good relationship with the Powhatan, the British aristocrats resent the leadership role he’s taken and do everything in their power to undermine and even arrest him.  This is gripping historical fiction, based on primary source documents, that presents the Indian perspective as well as the colonial.

Connections:  The Winter People by Joseph Bruchac, A Pickpocket’s Tale by Karen Schwabach, and The light in the Forest by Conrad Richter are other good novels about the Colonial Period in America.