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Posts Tagged «LGBTQA»

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

Monday, April 16th, 2018

51YD0qrSr6L._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_by Becky Albertalli, Grades 8 and up

Simon has a secret crush; it is so secret he can’t even share it with his amazing friends his super supportive family or his adoring little sister. He can’t share it because no one knows what he knows about himself, no one, even all his super supportive family and friends, no one but Blue. He met Blue online and they write each other every day. Blue is living a secret life too, so on top of being cool and liking the same kinds of music and enjoying talking about the same topics, Blue also gets Simon’s predicament. Simon is so worried about losing the only person that really understands him fully that he puts his other friendships at risk to protect his connection to Blue. But who is Blue, really? They only have ever emailed. What if he is not really who Simon imagines? What if it is all fake? What if he is making some of the biggest mistakes of his life?

If you enjoy books about first love or the balancing act of friendship and romance you might also like: My Basmati Bat Mitzva, by Paula J. Freedman, One Man Guy, by Michael Barakiva, or To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before, by Jenny Han.

Noteworthy

Monday, November 27th, 2017

31447601by Riley Redgate, 384 pages, Grades 7 and up

Jordan Sun’s parents are losing their patience. Even though Jordan has a partial scholarship to the prestigious Performance Arts high school she attends, her parents still have to work overtime to make ends meet, and once again Jordan did not get a lead role in the musical! Is it really worth all their hard earned money to send her to this school if she doesn’t get parts that will get her noticed for college scholarships? Jordan is worried that her parents will bring her home, so she comes up with a scheme to cross-dress and try out for a boys a cappella group called The Sharps. When Jordan transforms herself into Julian she is just looking to get some experience for her college application, but it turns out to be more than she bargained for. Becoming Julian has her considering what it means to be seen as a particular gender in American society; it also has her thinking about the sometimes fluid nature of sexuality. To complicate the whole situation love and friendship sneak up on her and have her doubting her own notions of loyalty, truth and what being a true friend really means.

If you like stories that take place in boarding schools you might also enjoy: The Education of Hailey Kendrick, by Ellen Cook, Carry On, by Rainbow Rowell, or Heist Society, by Ally Carter.

One Man Guy

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

onemanguyby Michael Barakiva, 255 pages, Grades 6-10

 

Alex Khederian’s parents lied to him. They promised him he could go to tennis camp and instead he is going to summer school! This seems bad enough, but then his best friend and constant confident, Becky, decides to kiss him. Because he is not attracted to her, the whole thing goes badly; Alex unintentionally hurts Becky’s feelings. Has he lost his best friend too? Things are adding up to the worst summer ever when Alex meets a boy named Josh in his summer school class. Josh and Alex are very different in many ways; Josh is an expert about cool places in the city and Alex is a specialist of everything Armenian (having grown up in a very proud Armenian family). The boys relationship turns into something more than friendship.  Now, Alex needs a friend to talk to more than ever; he knows Becky could help him explain his relationship with Josh to his seemingly old-world parents, but will she ever forgive him for rejecting her?

 

If you like books about identity, you may also enjoy Every Day, by David Levithan, or Totally Joe, by James Howe, or The Fault in our Stars, by John Green.

 

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Totally Joe

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

totallyjoeBy James Howe, 189 pages  Grades 6-8

<!–[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]–>“Being who you are isn’t a choice.”Although he had always lived this life lesson, it wasn’t until his favorite aunt gave him a button printed with these words that thirteen, year-old Joe really thought about what it meant for him, as a gay 7th grader, as well as for his schoolmates.Joe’s family and friends have always encouraged him to be himself (including dressing-up in dresses, playing with Barbies and cooking in an Easy-Bake oven) and he has always embraced his originality even when it led to teasing. Through an alphabiography project for his teacher, Joe shares his growing awareness of himself and his friends.

Connection:  Joe and the other characters were first introduced in Howe’s novel, The Misfits.  For other stories where characters share their life experiences through school writing assignments, try reading Love That Dog or Absolutely Normal Chaos by Sharon Creech, Shakespeare Bats Cleanup by Ron Koertge, or Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls.