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Posts Tagged «adult audience»

The Invention of Wings

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

web1_Invention-of-Wingsby Sue Monk Kidd, 373 pages, Adult audience

Sarah, the daughter of a plantation owner and slave master, is unusual for her time and place. She believes the African Americans enslaved on her father’s plantation are people and should not be owned. Unfortunately the rest of her family does not feel the same way she does, in fact, her mother is determined to bring her around to the “correct” way of thinking and presents her with the “gift” of an enslaved girl she calls Hettie on her birthday. Sarah tries not to accept the gift without success.

Hettie is a slave name, but Handfull is what her people call her. Handfull’s mother is the cook for Sarah’s family and lives in the house as well. Handfull worries about her mother because, in Handfull’s opinion, she takes too many risks; these risks have ended in terrible physical abuse and Handfull can’t take seeing her mother suffer like that. Sarah learns Handfull’s real name and wants to teach her how to read; Handfull’s mother encourages this seeing that the benefits of knowledge outweigh the risks of getting caught. For enslaved people punishments are so violent and grave it is hard to imagine how anyone can be so brave; these women know that being enslaved in body and mind is far worse than any physical abuse that might befall them. Freedom is the goal at any cost.

If you enjoy historical fiction about American History you might also enjoy: Chains, by Laurie Halse Anderson, or The Mighty Miss Malone, by Christopher Paul Curtis, or Uprising, by Margaret Peterson Haddix

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.

 

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

The_Sweetness_at_the_Bottom_of_the_Pieby Alan Bradley, 385 pages, Adult audience

Flavia de Luce is a spunky 11 year old with a chemistry lab of her own. She lives with her father and sisters, in a large home in the English countryside in the 1950s. Most girls at that time, including Flavia’s sisters Ophelia and Daphne, are interested in dressing up and doing their hair, but Flavia is passionate about researching the nature of various poisons (in fact, she has been known to try out a few of her concoctions on her annoying sisters from time to time) and solving mysteries. When a dead bird with a postage stamp in its beak shows up on their front porch, Flavia decides to investigate. Working on her own might prove too dangerous even for the intrepid and intelligent Flavia de Luce.

If you enjoy historical fiction with strong female characters, you might also enjoy The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows, or Deadly, by Julie Chibbaro.

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.

 

Cuckoo’s Calling

Monday, December 9th, 2013

cuckoo's callingby Robert Galbraith (really J.K. Rowling’s pseudonym), 455 pages, Adult Mystery

Lula Landry, gorgeous English supermodel, just fell from her penthouse balcony to her death. The media has no trouble believing the police’s verdict of suicide, after all, Lula lived in the fast lane, and everyone knows she has been on medication for mood swings as well.  That’s why when Lula’s brother shows up in Strike’s office, the veteran and struggling private investigator is taken by surprise. Strike is enduring a hard patch at the moment: the love of his life has just walked out, he is not only out of money, but overdue on shady loan payments, and is currently living in his office. Robin walks in to Strike’s office right before Lula’s brother; she has been sent there as a temporary secretary, and though Mr. Strike seems unprepared for her or for life in general, it has always been her secret dream to work for a private detective.

If you enjoy detective novels you might also like Heist Society, by Ally Carter, The Screaming Staircase, by Jonathan Stroud, or Death Cloud, by Andy Lane.

Click here to see if the book is in the library.

Railsea

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

by China Mieville, 424 pages, adult fiction, but great for adolescents

Railsea is a dystopian future society where the earth is covered in rails; there are islands of rubble scattered around the earth’s surface between the rails where people have built up towns, but any actual earth is uninhabitable.  Underground creatures have grown to gigantic size and anyone walking upon the natural ground is in danger of being swallowed up by huge moles, or giant insects.  The rails are home to a lot of different occupations: there are traders, thrill seekers, soldiers, and pirates, but Railsea’s central character, Sham, is a medic in training on a Moler vessel. The Molers are on a quest to finish off the mole that stole the captain’s arm, but Sham may have another destiny in his future adventures on the Railsea.

If you enjoy dystopian adventures you might also enjoy Maze Runner, by James Dashner,  Ship Breaker, by Paolo Bacigalupi or Incarceron, by Catherine Fisher.

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.