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Archive for March, 2013

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass

Friday, March 29th, 2013

by Russell Freedman, 119 pages, Grades 5-9

“‘He was the architect of his own fortune, a self-made man,’ Douglass wrote of Lincoln.  He had ‘ascended high but with hard hands and honest work build the ladder on which he climbed’ –  words that Douglass, as he was aware, could easily have applied to himself” (Freedman 103).

 

Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln had a lot in common:  they both grew up poor and uneducated, they both taught themselves because they greatly desired knowledge, and they both wanted to end the practice of slavery in the United States.  They were also very different men: Douglass was born a slave, Lincoln was born free, Douglass had to spend the first part of his life tortured and enslaved, and though Lincoln’s family was poor and he had to work hard he was never tortured.  Douglass and Lincoln also had different approaches to the problem of slavery, but they respected one another greatly even when they did not agree.

 

Freedman’s book is not only interesting, but also an easy read; you feel compelled to continue reading every word as though it were a suspenseful novel keeping you on the edge of your seat.

 

If you enjoy nonfiction, you might also like other books by Russell Freedman like:  The War to End All Wars, Who Was First:  Discovering the Americas, or The Voice that Challenged a Nation: Marion Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights.  

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.

 

Break My Heart 1,000 Times

Friday, March 29th, 2013

by Daniel Waters, 342 pages, Grades 7 and up

 

In Veronica’s world there are ghosts among the living.  Since “the Event” people from the past inhabit the world of the living; they look like solid people for the moments they visit, but then they fade away kind of like a short hologram of the person playing the same piece of film over and over.  Veronica’s dad sits at the breakfast table every day and Mary, a teenage girl who was murdered, climbs the front steps of a neighbor every morning as Veronica is walking to school. You get used to it, until it feels like the dead might actually be able to affect the living.  Kirk and Veronica have been asked to research the local ghosts by one of their teachers, and this sometimes means visiting the places where people have died – ghosts often appear to replay their death scene.  Just that seems creepy enough, but Veronica and Kirk might  be stumbling into the path of a murderer unprepared.  

 

If you enjoy suspenseful books you might also like Girl Stolen, by April Henry, or if you like ghost stories you might like Ghosts of the Titanic, by Julie Lawson.

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.

 

Outcasts United

Friday, March 29th, 2013

by Warren St. John, 226 pages, Grades 7 and up

This is a book of many true stories beginning with Luma Mufleh.  She is a Jordanian exchange student and avid soccer player, who decided to remain in the United States after completing her education at Smith University in Massachusetts.  She made her way to the suburbs of Atlanta Georgia and stumbled upon a very interesting city called Clarkston.  

The U.S. government had been relocating refugees since the 1980s and this little town had become extremely cosmopolitan.  People fleeing wars in their homelands of Bosnia, Afghanistan, Liberia, Ethiopia and many other countries all ended up thrown together in the town of Clarkston.  Mufleh was drawn to the place when she noticed their grocery store carried food she missed from home, but the thing that really grabbed her attention was the groups of young boys playing soccer on every available field she saw.  All of them were playing in bare feet, but they showed more passion for the game than any of the kids she was coaching in the suburbs.  She decided to bring a soccer program to Clarkston.  Mufleh coaches three teams of boys called the Fugees; this book is a collection of their stories and the teams’ stories.  

To watch a video about the team go to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ItUYQhQ_CHg#!

 

 

Kids of Kabul

Saturday, March 2nd, 2013

 

by Deborah Ellis, 137 pages, Grades 6-8

This is a nonfiction collection of stories from the perspective of different kids living through the wars of Afghanistan. These children have lived through the violence of war and the challenges of survival in war’s aftermath.  Each chapter is a heartwrenching story of survival; the characters are pragmatic and realistic, and most unbelievably remain hopeful as they look toward the future.  

If you enjoy reading nonfiction books about kids your age you might also enjoy Girl, 13, by Starla Griffin, From Jazz Babies to Generation Next: The history of the American teenager, by Laura B. Edge, or Claudet Colvin: Twice toward justice, by Phillip Hoose.

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.

Homesick

Saturday, March 2nd, 2013

 

by Kate Klise, 180 pages, Grades 6-8

Poor Benny is homesick in his own house. Benny’s dad is a junk expert, but when his shop gets closed down and he brings all his stuff home – he cannot part with even a tiny bit – Benny’s mom just can take the clutter and she moves back to her hometown by herself. It doesn’t feel like home to Benny anymore because the kitchen is full of empty pizza boxes and nothing to eat, the house is stacked with random stuff, his dad seems lost in his own worries, and, of course, his mom isn’t there.

Now that the town has won “The Most Charming Town” contest more people than just Benny and his mom want to see their house cleaned out; no one is sure that their town can live up to expectations since Miss Turnipson embellished quite a bit when she wrote her entrance essay nominating the town.  The contest officials are due in town any day and pulling the town together might take more than is humanly possible.

If you enjoy books about quirky towns and interesting characters you might also like:  Deliver Us From Normal by Kate Klise, A Long Way from Chicago, by Richard Peck, or Ruby Holler, by Sharon Creech.

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.