Contact PMSDirections to PMSSite Map

pmslibrary@piedmont.k12.ca.us Subscribe to my updates

Archive for August, 2012

Promise the Night

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

promise the nightby Michaela MacColl, 262 pages, grades 6 & up

When Beryl's dog was dragged away from her mud hut by a leopard in the middle of the night because she forgot to secure the door flap, Beryl vows to find him… then does.  When people start refering to her as a "wild child" and Beryl's dad tries to get her a British nanny, Beryl seeks education alongside the boys from the local Nandi tribe.  When she is told that girls don't get to go on lion hunts…

Beryl Markham was the first pilot to fly solo from England to North America.  She spent her life defying the rules that society placed on her and other women of the time.  Promise the Night is a novel based on Beryl's remarkable childhood in Africa.

If you would like to read Beryl's own story of her life as a pilot, you could read her autobiography, West with the Night.

 

Click here to see if the book is in the library.

CYRM 2012-13 Nominees

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

Have you read the California Young Reader Medal nominees this year?

Middle School

Invisible Lines by Mary AmatoWild Things by Clay CarmichaelOut of My Mind by Sharon Draper

Invisible Lines by Mary Amato, Wild Things by Clay Charmichael, Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper

Young Adult

Matched by Ally CondieBeautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret StohlThe Things a Brother Knows by Dana Reinhardt

Matched by Ally Condie, Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl, The Things a Brother Knows by Dana Reinhardt

Looking For Me

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

looking.for.meby Betsy R. Rosentahl, 165 pages, Grades 6-8

 
Edith is number four in a family with 12 children. They call her the good little mother because everyone counts on her to take care of the smaller children, but she is not sure this label really fits her. The novel is written in verse, each poem illustrating a piece of Edith’s life and coming together to form a complete coming-of-age story full of challenges.  She has to overcome bigoted teasing, her family’s financial hardships, and personal loss as she learns to understand who she among the chaotic comings and goings in this big huge family.
 
If you enjoy stories of kids who overcome against the odds you might also like: Elijah of Buxton, by Christopher Paul Curtis, Small Acts of Amaing Courage, by Gloria Whelan, or Waiting for Normal, by Leslie Connor.
 

Uprising

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

uprisingMargaret Peterson Haddix, 346 pages, Grades 6-8

 
Uprising is told from the point of view of three young women living in New York City in 1911.  Two are immigrants, one from Russia, Yetta, one recently arrived from Italy, Bella; both are factory girls living downtown, working long hours, and saving every penny possible to send home to their families in the old country. The other girl, Jane, has grown up privileged; she has a closet full of fancy dresses, servants to dress, feed and drive her.
The immigrant girls work for a shirtwaist factory where bosses force girls to work in dangerous conditions, for long grueling hours, and then cheat them when payday rolls around.  Jane finds herself moved by the factory workers plight and circumstances bring these women together.  It soon becomes clear they are really not so different; all are trapped and powerless as are most women of that time.
The suspenseful conclusion brings vivid detail to the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire that took the lives of so many young girls on March 25, 1911.
 
If you enjoy suspensful historical fiction you might also like Across the Nightengale Floor, by Lian Hearn, or Chains, by Laurie Halse Anderson.
 

 

Ghetto Cowboy

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

ghetto_cowboy_coverby G. Neri, 218 pages, Grades 5-8

 
Cole has caused his mom so much trouble that she has decided to deliver him to his father’s in the hopes that Cole’s dad can shape up her 12 year old before it is too late.  Cole has never met his father, so he’s unsure what to expect, but when he finds out his father lives like a cowboy in the middle of the city racing horses and teaching city kids to ride, he is beyond shocked.  He cannot believe his mom is leaving him in this crazy place; his father doesn’t even have an extra bedroom for him, and his idea of helping out around the house has Cole shoveling horse manure!  Who is this ghetto cowboy, and how could his mom trust him to take care of Cole, when everything around here seems to be falling apart?
 
If you enjoy reading books about different cultures right here in our country, you might also enjoy Waiting for Normal, by Leslie Connor, or Guitar Boy, by M.J. Auch. If you like books about families dealing with troubled teens you might also enjoy Watson's Go To Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis, and Absolutely Normal Chaos, by Sharon Creech.
 

Curveball: the Year I Lost My Grip

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

curveballby Jordan Sonnenblick, 285 pages, Grades 7-9

 
Peter and his best friend are the dynamic duo on the baseball field until Peter severely injures his elbow at the end of eighth grade.  Peter begins high school trying to figure out who he is, if  he is no longer a pitcher, and how he can fit in. On top of that something strange is happening to his grandfather, who is his best friend, and he can’t talk to his parents about it.  Luckily his photography teacher partners him with a cute girl who is actually pretty hilarious, so maybe he won’t have to figure it all out on his own.
 
If you enjoy books about personal struggle and identity you might also enjoy Running Dream, by Wendelin Van Draanen, The Cardturner, by Louis Sacher, Scrawl, by Mark Shulman, or Okay for Now, by Gary D. Schmidt
 

Moon Over Manifest

Monday, August 13th, 2012

PDF Creation in Quark 7by Clare Vanderpool, 351 pages, Grades 5-8

 
Abilene is used to moving from place to place in 1936.  She and her dad never stay too long anywhere so she has seen a lot of different towns in her 12 years.  Unstable as life on the road might seem to an outsider, Abilene’s dad has been the one constant in her life; they always stick together.  This summer, though, things are different; her dad just drops her in his hometown of Manifest with complete strangers (his father’s good friends) and leaves her there alone.  He says it is just for the summer, but Pastor Shady makes her attend the last day of school anyway.  At first she thinks she’ll be quietly counting the days until her stay in Manifest is over, but then she discovers a loose floorboard with treasures beneath:  letters and mementos about the town in 1918 and a notorious WWII spy called the Rattler.  Abilene is surrounded by mysteries and is determined to discover how these characters fit together and what they can teach her about her father’s personal history as well.
 
If you enjoy stories about kids overcoming family hardship, you might also enjoy Waiting for Normal, by Leslie Connor, or Absolutely Normal Chaos, by Sharon Creech, or A Dog for Life, by L.S. Matthews.
 

Elsewhere

Monday, August 13th, 2012

elsewhereby Gabrielle Zevin, 276 pages, Grades 7-10

 
Lizzie’s end begins on a boat on its way to Elsewhere, but Lizzie doesn’t understand how she got there or where she is going.  The last thing she remembers was her bike ride to the mall; she was supposed to meet Zooey to pick out prom dresses.  This must be a dream:  a boat full of old people, no one almost 16 like Lizzie, and a rock star who says that he is dead.  But Lizzie can’t wake up.  Elsewhere is a backwards world of young grandparents, tattoos that grow brighter and disappear instead of fading, auto accidents that do not cause pain, and pets who communicate with people.  Why does Lizzie find herself in Elsewhere and how can she get back home?  Will she get her driver’s license as planned? Will prom happen without her?
 
Other books for those who enjoy alternate realities and after-death possibilities include Everlost, by Neal Shusterman, or The Graveyard Book, by Neil Gaiman
 

Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual

Monday, August 13th, 2012

food-rules-cover-484by Michael Pollan, Illustrated by Maira Kalman, 207 pages, all ages

Eating healthy food has become complicated in the modern western world.  According to Michael Pollan many of us have grown up eating “edible foodlike substances” instead of, or in addition to real food.  The food industry’s advertising and marketing has made finding healthy food very complicated.  Pollan has a simple message:  “Eat food, mostly plants, not too much.”  He breaks into some clever and easy-to-follow rules for healthy eating including:  “Avoid food products containing ingredients that no ordinary person would keep in the pantry,” “Eat animals that have themselves eaten well,” and “Eat when you are hungry, not when you are bored.”
If you enjoy reading about the food we eat you might also enjoy Man Eating Bugs: the Art and Science of Eating Insects, by Peter Menzel.

Earth Unaware: the First Formic War

Monday, August 13th, 2012

earth unawareby Orson Scott Card and Aaron Johnston, 368 pages, Grades 7 and up.

Before the earth began preparing for the inevitability of alien contact, before they had faster than light speed communication capabilities, before they had Ender to pin their hopes on, earth was caught unaware.  This is the story of the world before the first Bugger invasion.  It is the first book of a new trilogy that tells what happened before Ender’s Game began; it is the story of earth’s incredible survival in a war they were unprepared for, and staggeringly unequipped to participate in, but when aliens attack people of earth do anything and everything to protect their homeland.

If you enjoyed the Ender’s Game series this new trilogy will not disappoint, but better read after Ender’s Game itself.